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Rapid, durable, and significant reductions in splenomegaly with JAKAVI, regardless of JAK2V617F mutation status1

Significant reduction in spleen volume throughout the 48-week study period and 3-year follow-up1,2

COMFORT-II: Percentage of patients who achieved ≥35% reduction in spleen volume at Week 481

Significant reduction in spleen volume was seen with JAK inhibitor therapy - JAKAVI

Adapted from: Harrison C et al. N Engl J Med. 2012;366:787-798.1

  • 51% of patients treated with JAKAVI (75/146) achieved ≥35% reduction in spleen volume at any time during the 3-year follow-up2

Significant reduction in splenomegaly regardless of JAK2V617F mutation status1,3

Percentage change in spleen volume, by JAK2V617F mutation, from baseline at Week 483

Patients treated with JAKAVI, a JAK2 Inhibitor, experienced significant spleen volume reduction regardless of mutation status

Adapted from: Harrison C, Kiladjian J-J, Barosi G; for the COMFORT-II authors. Ruxolitinib for myelofibrosis [letter]. N Engl J Med. 2012;366(21):2032-2034.3
Based on a post hoc analysis.

  • 97% of patients treated with JAKAVI (132/136) achieved any reduction in spleen volume at any time during the 48-week study period, while a majority of patients in the BAT arm progressively worsened1*

Significant spleen reductions sustained at 3-year follow-up2

COMFORT-II: Rapid and durable reduction in spleen volume with JAKAVI2

Rapid and durable reduction in spleen volume in Myelofibrosis patients with JAKAVI, a JAK2 Inhibitor

Adapted from: Cervantes F et al. Blood. 2013;122:4047-4053.2
Based on a prespecified exploratory endpoint. JAKAVI included both randomised and extension phases; BAT included randomised phase only and did not include assessments after crossover.

  • Median time to ≥35% reduction in spleen volume was as early as 12 weeks1
  • Kaplan-Meier estimated probabilities of maintaining a ≥35% reduction in spleen volume at Weeks 48 and 144 were 73% (95% CI: 61-82) and 50% (95% CI: 36-63), respectively2

JAKAVI Treatment in Clinical Practice: Treating splenomegaly in a patient with high disease burden but low IPSS risk

The IPSS is an effective tool to predict survival time; however, it may not account for the impact of MF-related symptoms, including splenomegaly. Watch the video below to learn more from Dr Claire Harrison on treating splenomegaly in patients with MF.

Next: Significant symptom improvement with JAKAVI

BAT=best available therapy; COMFORT=Controlled Myelofibrosis Study with Oral JAK Inhibitor Treatment; IPSS= International Prognostic Scoring System; MF=myelofibrosis.

*Based on a prespecified exploratory endpoint.

References:

  1. Harrison C, Kiladjian J-J, Al-Ali HK, et al. JAK inhibition with ruxolitinib versus best available therapy for myelofibrosis. N Engl J Med. 2012;366(9):787-798.
  2. Cervantes F, Vannucchi AM, Kiladjian J-J, et al; for the COMFORT-II investigators. Three-year efficacy, safety, and survival findings from COMFORT-II, a phase 3 study comparing ruxolitinib with best available therapy for myelofibrosis. Blood. 2013;122(25):4047-4053.
  3. Harrison C, Kiladjian J-J, Barosi G; for the COMFORT-II authors. Ruxolitinib for myelofibrosis [letter]. N Engl J Med. 2012;366(21):2032-2034.